My favorite dairy-free blueberry pancake recipe

Dairy free pancake recipe - Permanent RiotA weekend morning in our house is not complete without a homemade breakfast. A lot of the time it’s waffles but almost as often we end up making pancakes. I have always been a huge fan of pancakes (and pumpkin pancakes in the fall!) and never make any recipe for classic blueberry pancakes other than the one I got from my mom, who got it from my grandma. I’m not sure where this recipe originated, but it’s the one we’ve been cooking up since I was a little girl and to me there’s nothing tastier. There have been many a drop of pancake batter spilled on this old recipe card, but by now I’ve cooked it so many times I know the whole thing by heart.

Dairy free pancake recipe - Permanent RiotWhen my youngest daughter Edith was born and we realized that she had a dairy allergy, the classic family pancake recipe was suddenly out of the question. The version I created to replace it uses just a few little tweaks and has become something just as tasty that our whole family (Edith included) can enjoy. If you aren’t dealing with anyone who avoids dairy you could certainly go back to the original recipe ingredients (whole milk and real butter) but I actually sort of prefer the taste and texture of the non-dairy version.

Dairy free pancake recipe - Permanent RiotMy grandma’s recipe called for blueberries (and I LOVE blueberry pancakes) but sometimes the kids would rather have heart shaped pancakes instead of blueberry ones. Most days we do a few of each. These are just as good without the berries (thanks to a healthy dose of cinnamon) so whether you add blueberries or not they’re sure to be delicious.

Dairy free pancake recipe - Permanent RiotThe key to a perfectly cooked pancake is to not rush it – patience is a virtue when it comes to your griddle. If it’s too hot you’ll have burnt outsides and gooey insides. Aim for a low to medium heat and get a cup of coffee to sip while they cook nice and slowly. When bubbles start to cover the top side you’ll know it’s time to flip them over.

Dairy free pancake recipe - Permanent Riot

In our house we like to keep things simple and with as short of an ingredient list as possible, so I love that I can substitute coconut oil into most of my baking in lieu of butter. It is just one simple ingredient that’s easy to have on hand and better for you than manufactured products like vegan butter. It does, however, leave a bit of a subtle coconutty tropical taste (and smell, mmmm) so if coconut isn’t your thing, feel free to use your preferred dairy free butter substitute. My older kids have never commented on the switch from butter to coconut oil and I love the taste!

Grandma’s (newly dairy-free) blueberry pancakes

  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1 well beaten egg
  • 1/8 cup melted coconut oil
  • 2 Tbsp sugar
  • 3/4 tsp salt
  • 2 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • a good hefty dash of cinnamon
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/4 cup blueberries

Directions

In a large bowl, beat egg together with almond milk and melted coconut oil until thoroughly combined. Add sugar, salt, baking powder and cinnamon and stir well again. Once all ingredients are well mixed, add in flour and stir until just combined, being careful not to overmix. Add in blueberries if desired. Heat griddle over low to medium heat. Spoon batter onto griddle and allow to cook until bubbles form on the top side. Flip and cook until lightly browned on both sides. Enjoy!

Dairy free pancake recipe - Permanent Riot

My favorite dairy-free blueberry pancake recipe

My favorite (and dairy-free) waffle recipe

dairy free waffle recipe on Permanent RiotMy kids are waffle fanatics. I personally prefer pancakes, but when you’re making breakfast for five it’s best to go with the crowd… and the crowd in our house adamantly cheers “WAFFLES!” at least once a week. I know that when most people think of waffles on a hectic weekday morning they think eggo – but I promise that these whip up in barely more time than it takes to toast a ready-made waffle, and they are infinitely more tasty!

I originally found a variation of this waffle recipe on allrecipes and I used to make it just as written, but when Edith came along and was allergic to all dairy products I started looking for ways to make the foods that we love, but in a way that both I as a nursing mom to a baby with a dairy allergy and our food-loving kids could be happy with. The secret, as it turns out, is almond milk! Soy milk in recipes can make baked goods taste a bit, well, soyish but almond milk has very little in the way of distinct flavor, and it is nice and creamy which is delicious! My recipe also makes half as many waffles – as we would hardly ever eat a full batch of the original recipe, and my waffle snobs prefer fresh waffles to reheated (even though I think they’re great toasted the next day!)

If you know me at all you’ll know that I hate to get a bunch of dishes dirty unnecessarily while cooking – while I love to make things I definitely don’t love washing dishes – so I’ve devised a way of making my homemade batters with only one bowl and measuring implements. Most recipes will have you mix wet and dry ingredients separately, and it’s for good reason. The more that you mix up flour with liquid ingredients, the more that gluten is formed, which can make things dense and chewy – it’s the reason that every muffin recipe ever written implores you not to over-mix. To make a batter without over-mixing while still making sure that all of the rest of the dry ingredients are well incorporated, I’ve taken to modifying ever so slightly and mixing all of the wet ingredients thoroughly, then adding every dry ingredient but the flour, mixing well and then, at the last minute adding in the flour and giving one last stir. There is, of course, also still the issue of the leavening – in this case baking powder, which begins to be activated as soon as the liquid touches it – but I find in a recipe like waffles or pancakes where the whole thing start to finish is done in 5 minutes or less, it doesn’t make much difference.

dairy free waffle recipe on Permanent RiotFor me, the secret to the world’s fluffiest waffles is tons and tons of whisking. I whisk the liquid ingredients into a proper frenzy before adding the dry ingredients (except for the flour, don’t forget to wait on the flour!) then giving it another big whisking before adding the flour and giving one last stir.

dairy free waffle recipe on Permanent RiotMy batter is always crazy light and bubbly, but it makes some of the fluffiest waffles known to man!

dairy free waffle recipe on Permanent RiotI’m providing two versions of this recipe today – and I liken the difference between them to the difference between a sinful nutella crepe and it’s slightly less decadent cousin the galette de sarrasin (buckwheat crepe). They’re both delicious and I personally would eat either one any day of the week – but some days you might feel just the tiniest bit guilty that your nutella crepe isn’t ticking all the nutritional check-boxes and long for something with ever so slightly more of a nod to health. In that case go for the wheat waffle with slightly less oil. I discovered that these waffles would still turn out with zero oil during a hectic morning when I omitted it entirely. In this version I add a little oil but not quite as much – it’s still delicious (especially with some jam like my kids eat them) but never quite *as* delicious in my opinion as the original waffle (topped with whipped cream, of course).

dairy free waffle recipe on Permanent Riot

Sinfully delicious dairy-free waffles
Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons white sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour

Directions
In a large bowl, whisk one egg until foamy. Add almond milk, vanilla and vegetable oil and whisk thoroughly again. Once mixed, add in sugar, baking powder and salt and whisk a third time. Once all dry ingredients are well incorporated, add in flour and mix until just combined. Pour into pre-heated waffle iron. Follow your waffle-maker’s directions for cook time. Mine are done right when the steam starts slowing noticeably from the sides of the waffle maker. Top with freshly whipped coconut cream and enjoy!

Tasty dairy-free wheat waffles
Ingredients

  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup almond milk
  • 1/8 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons white sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole-wheat flour

Directions
In a large bowl, whisk one egg until foamy. Add almond milk, vanilla and vegetable oil and whisk thoroughly again. Once mixed, add in sugar, baking powder and salt and whisk a third time. Once all dry ingredients are well incorporated, add in flours and mix until just combined. Pour into pre-heated waffle iron. Follow your waffle-maker’s directions for cook time. Mine are done right when the steam starts slowing noticeably from the sides of the waffle maker. Top with your favorite jam and enjoy!

My favorite (and dairy-free) waffle recipe

Happy Valentine’s Day

We started our day with some heart shaped pancakes topped with raspberry jam. YUM. I’m not organized enough to arrange babysitters ahead of time (or ever) so Ben and I had our official date a week early while my mom was in town to watch the kids (thanks mom!) We will be celebrating with some fancy takeout food this evening (French perhaps?) and snuggling on the couch. And in case you missed it… the peanuts made a valentine too 🙂

Happy Valentine’s Day

fresh ricotta {cooking}

A friend of mine sent me a link to a DELICIOUS looking recipe for lentil “meatballs”. I definitely plan to try it out (it looks super tasty) but what I was even MORE excited about in that link was the mention of fresh homemade ricotta cheese. It looked amazing! I will eat pretty much any kind of cheese, at any time, with anything so this sounded right up my alley.

I was a bit nervous since I had never attempted anything like this before but thought what the heck – it’s just a little wasted milk and cream if it doesn’t turn out. The recipe sounded so simple, how could I go wrong?

Turns out that making ricotta cheese is a bit like making buttercream for me. I fret and fidget and watch as it’s coming together “does it look right?” “is it supposed to be doing that” and I mess with it all together too much. But in the end it surprises me and looks exactly as it’s supposed to. Oh, and it tastes fabulous as well.

To start put all the ingredients in a pot and bring to a “gentle” boil over medium heat – here’s one of many parts where I get confused and I’ve only just started. First off WHAT is with those yellow spots floating in the buttermilk?! My initial reaction was that it was spoiled, even though it had clearly not reached its expiration date yet. A quick search of my old friend google led me to an article about buttermilk which says that some manufacturers (and specifically the one I had used) add “butter flakes” (whatever that is) to cultured buttermilk to make it seem more like real buttermilk. Ok. A bit sketched out already but at least it’s not rotten. Continuing on.

Next get together a sieve and put over a large bowl. Check. Easy enough

And here is where I got confused (again). I am never sure what “medium heat” is so I didn’t know if my stove was at the proper setting. I also have a thermometer that I use (once again in making buttercream – see those similarities coming back 🙂 ) in boiling liquids, but it has a marking on it that says “immersion” and I’m never sure if it has to be all the way submerged up to that line to be accurate – because it certainly wasn’t this time. So I’m not sure if I was cooking at the right speed or up to the right temperature.

The recipe states that it will begin separating between 175 and 200 degrees. But at 175 degrees mine was looking decidedly soupy.

It didn’t start to form curds until right up at the 200 degree mark on my thermometer – but then again who knows if that was even accurate (can you tell I am not a great cook?)

I decided to pull it out and strain it and hope for the best – unsure what would happen if I let it keep cooking and getting hotter (past the recommendations of the recipe). Straining it was pretty fun.

And the result – I was pretty impressed with it, it looks pretty good right?

It also tastes DELICIOUS. I was all excited to start on the lentil meatballs when I realized that I used up the last of our lentils making lentil tacos the other night (blast!) so I will have to wait until I can get out and buy some more. In the meantime I’m trying to hold myself back from just eating all of it straight out of the container with a spoon. Seeing as it’s made from buttermilk, whole milk and cream it’s probably not the kind of food you want to consume mass quantities of – unless you’re trying to gain weight (which I’m certainly not). Hopefully the meatballs can be tomorrow’s dinner.

fresh ricotta {cooking}